Sales and Sales Management Blog

December 2, 2008

Guest Article: “Top 5% Achievers Expect to be Successful Because They Plan for It,” by Jonathan Farrington


Top 5% Achievers Expect To Be Successful Because They Plan For It
by Jonathan Farrington

Success should be something you don’t just ‘Kinda Sorta’ want to achieve but something you must achieve.

Generally top achievers expect to be successful and as a consequence they usually are.

They are driven by a ‘have to’ attitude not a ‘want to’ attitude.

If you have no concrete goals and you have been succeeding in spite of yourself, just think how much more success you could enjoy if you set your sights on a definite path and had a specific time-frame in which you expect to reach your destination.

Setting Goals Keeps You Focussed:

What you should know is that goals give you three distinct advantages, which help you succeed:

  • Goals keep you on track
  • Goals let you know when and what to celebrate
  • Goals give you a focussed plan to work with

If nothing else, goals let others know what they have to aim for to keep up with your standards.

Effective Goal Setting:

Take the time to think about what would make you happy, contented and satisfied and about what would motivate you to become a Top 5% Player.

It’s important to remember that goals are maps; they will guide you towards your success – the more detailed your goal setting the easier it will be for you to reach your destination.

When you are in the first stage of goal setting you also need to remember two important factors – i.e.

  • The goal must be better than your best yet – but it must be achievable.
  • Goals should be based on productivity not production.

Keeping these two rules of goal setting firmly in your mind will help you to form and stay committed to what is really important to you.

Time Yourself – By Months, Years & Decades:

  • Always begin with long-term goals and work backwards. Your long-term goals are probably the most difficult to set anyway, so if you set those first, you accomplish the tough stuff right up-front.
  • Long-term goals should be five-year projections and three areas you may want to consider when you set them are personal accomplishments, status symbols and net worth.
  • Medium-term goals are usually three year projections and the same criteria can be used – but again think productivity not production and consider the activity that will be necessary to achieve success.
  • Short-term goals will demand most of your attention and these are usually a twelve-month projection although you can set ‘immediate goals’ which have a 90-day projection.

You must believe you can achieve all of your goals – otherwise you will not
achieve them.

Setting a Well Balanced Diet of Goals:

It is essential to set personal as well as career goals to keep your life well balanced. If all your goals are connected to your commercial life, you will have trouble taking time out for family and friends because you will always be pushing towards the next career goal.

Remember:

Work smarter not harder. Setting personal goals gives you a life after business.

Put Your Goals in Writing:

Once you have formulated your goals it is time to make your final commitment to them by putting them down in writing. This is undoubtedly the single most important step in goal setting because until they are inscribed somewhere they are merely wishes and dreams.

After you have written them down, your mind will start seeking out whatever it will take to make them a reality.

Remember:

The moment you start moving forward towards a goal is the moment you start to succeed.

In Summary:

Even though you do not need to set goals in order to reach some level of success, most professionals who fail to set goals reach a plateau and lack either the motivation or the direction to go beyond it. They are unable to move upwards to a higher achievement status.

 

Jonathan Farrington is a globally recognized business coach, mentor, author, and consultant, who has guided hundreds of companies and tens of thousands of individuals around the world towards optimum performance levels.  He has authored in excess of three hundred skills development programmes, designed a range of unique and innovative process tools and has been published extensively on a wide range of business topics including organizational and sales team development, leadership and the customer imperative.  Jonathan’s first book, “Tougher At The Top” will be published early in 2009.  Visit his website at http://www.jonathanfarrington.com

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4 Comments »

  1. […] unknown wrote an interesting post today onGuest Article: â??Top 5% Achievers Expect to be Successful Because …Here’s a quick excerptSales and Sales Management Blog. December 2, 2008 … Paul McCord’s discussion of current sales and sales management issues. For my bio, see the “About Paul McCord” page. Pages. About Paul McCord · Contact Paul · Get Your Book Reviewed … […]

    Pingback by Online Advertising Live » Blog Archive » Guest Article: “Top 5% Achievers Expect to be Successful Because … — December 2, 2008 @ 10:43 am | Reply

  2. I love that you pointed out that the most important apsect of setting a goal is to write it down! I believe that this is the piece that most people miss.

    Great article, very informative!

    Denise
    http://www.successforrealpeople.com
    http://www.successforrealpeople.wordpress.com

    Comment by successforrealpeople — December 2, 2008 @ 5:12 pm | Reply

  3. Shoot…I wish there was a way to edit comments. It drives me crazy to see a typo AFTER I’ve hit the submit button 🙂

    Comment by successforrealpeople — December 2, 2008 @ 5:14 pm | Reply

  4. […] Why Is Goal Setting So Important In Sales? Posted on December 4, 2008 by Dave Stein Jonathan Farrington wrote a guest post on Paul McCord’s blog this week, entitled Top 5% Achievers Expect to be Successful Because They Plan for It. […]

    Pingback by Why Is Goal Setting So Important In Sales? « Dave Stein’s Blog :: Commentary for Sales Leaders and Sales Managers — December 4, 2008 @ 3:33 am | Reply


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