Sales and Sales Management Blog

February 5, 2015

Objection? Buying Signal? Maybe Neither–Maybe You’re Being Put Under the Microscope

A few years ago I wrote an article titled “How to Take the Sting Out of the Price Question Early in the Sale.”  In the course of the article I argued that it is natural for a prospect to ask about price–and often to do so too early in the sale, before the seller has had an opportunity to create real value for the prospect—because price is one of the factors prospects use as they seek to qualify the seller and the purchasing opportunity.

In response to that article I received numerous emails and comments from salespeople and sales leaders that they had never thought about the idea that the prospect is qualifying them and their offering at the same time they are trying to qualify the prospect.

Yet the prospect’s qualifying the seller and the seller’s value/solution is the crux of the whole sales process.

We are all familiar with the concepts of qualifying the prospect, investigating needs, developing a solution and creating real value for the prospect, overcoming objections, and the other aspects of making a sale.  All of these concepts are views of the sales process from the seller’s perspective.  These are the constructs that we as sellers tend to concentrate on.

We then view the prospect’s questions as either worrisome objections that are nothing but a smokescreen or are out-n-out buying signals.  For many of us, the questions and actions of the prospect are either those of an enemy or those of someone telling us they are ready to buy.

What if neither of those choices is true?

What if all of those questions and the statements by the prospect, instead of being obstacles to our sale or indications of their desire to consummate the purchase, are simply questions and statements to help them qualify us and our offering? 

What if they are doing the same to us as we are doing to them?

If that is the case, then that means we’re neither dealing with an enemy to be overcome nor are we dealing with someone asking us to close them.  Instead we’re dealing with a human being who wants to know whether or not we’re trustworthy, whether or not our offering is appropriate for them, whether or not we’re wasting their time.

In other words, they are in the process of qualifying us just as much as we’re qualifying them.  When we qualify a prospect we ask questions and probe to discover who we’re dealing with and what we might be able to do for them.  When we’re asking questions we’re not trying to play the ‘gotcha’ game.  Most of us aren’t trying to trap them into a sale.  We’re honestly seeking information that allows us to know whether or not we are in front of a real prospect with a real need that we can help solve in a way that produces real value for them.

The prospect is going through the same process with us.  Whether they are conscious of it or not, they’re trying to determine whether or not we are someone they want to do business with, and then, whether or not our product/service/company presents any real solid worthwhile value for them.

The traditional terms sellers think in—overcoming objections, closing the sale, etc.—tend to set up an adversarial relationship where we are on the lookout for the dreaded objection and the opportunity to pounce with the closing question.

However, if we recognize that the sales process involves both parties qualifying one another and that the qualifying process involves the investigation and questioning of each party, we can relax and begin to address the prospect’s questions for what they really are—a legitimate desire to find out who we are and whether or not we are someone they want to work with.

Go forth and qualify—and let yourself be qualified.  It’s a whole lot more fun to sell when you’re working with a prospect to mutually qualify one another than it is to try to out fox and overcome an adversary.

 

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January 14, 2013

Are You Really The One Being Qualified?

Every seller is concerned about qualifying their prospects.  We all want to be in front of prospects who can buy—that is, who not only have a need or desire but also the means to consummate the purchase.  Qualifying a prospect can be simple or complex depending on how many criteria a suspect must meet in order to be classified as a quality prospect. 

Consequently we sellers try to use as many tools at our disposal as possible to learn about and quality those we think could be quality prospects for us.  And one of the most important and oft used tools is the question, open ended, probing questions in particular.

Unfortunately we seldom, if ever, consider that the prospect is doing exactly the same thing to us—they are actively trying to determine if we are someone they would buy from.    

Many of us have been taught that our sequence of events should be: qualify, present, close, answer objections, close again.  This sequence has a number of variations, some quite complex, but in the end, this is the format a great many of use have been taught.

Although we view our questions as important discovery questions, we tend to view the prospect’s questions as either worrisome objections or diversions that are nothing but a smokescreen or are out-n-out buying signals. For many of us, the questions and actions of the prospect are either those of an enemy or those of someone telling us they are ready to buy.

What if neither of those choices is true?

What if all of those questions and the statements by the prospect, instead of being obstacles to our sale or indications of their desire to consummate the purchase, are simply questions and statements to help them qualify us and our offering?

What if they are doing the same to us as we are doing to them?

If that is the case, then that means we’re neither dealing with an enemy to be overcome nor are we dealing with someone asking us to close them. Instead we’re dealing with a human being who wants to know whether or not we’re trustworthy, whether or not our offering is appropriate for them, whether or not we’re wasting their time.

In other words, they are in the process of qualifying us just as much as we’re qualifying them. When we qualify a prospect we ask questions and probe to discover who we’re dealing with and what we might be able to do for them. When we’re asking questions we’re not trying to play the ‘gotcha’ game. Most of us aren’t trying to trap them into a sale. We’re honestly seeking information that allows us to know whether or not we are in front of a real prospect with a real need that we can help solve in a way that produces real value for them.

The prospect is going through the same process with us. Whether they are conscious of it or not, they’re trying to determine whether or not we are someone they want to do business with and then, whether or not our product/service/company presents any real solid worthwhile value for them.

The traditional terms sellers think in—overcoming objections, closing the sale, etc.—tend to set up an adversarial relationship where we are on the lookout for the dreaded objection and the opportunity to pounce with the closing question.

However, if we recognize that the sales process involves both parties qualifying one another and that the qualifying process involves the investigation and questioning of each party, we can relax and begin to address the prospect’s questions for what they really are—a legitimate desire to find out who we are and whether or not we are someone they want to work with.

Recognize an honest qualifying question for what it is.  Maybe those questions you are trying to overcome, especially about price or quantity or delivery or usage, aren’t objections or buying signals at all but are just honest discovery questions.

Go forth and qualify—and let yourself be qualified. It’s a whole lot more fun to sell when you’re working with a prospect to mutually qualify one another than it is to try to out fox and overcome an adversary.

 

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May 31, 2011

How to Take the Sting Out of the Price Question Early in the Sale

“So, how much will it cost?”

“What would something like this run me?”

“We have a very limited budget.  I don’t want to waste my time.  What’s your fee?”

“Sounds to me like you’re talking about a lot of money.  Before we go any farther I need to know what kind of money we’re looking at.”

We’ve all heard these questions or a million other variations of them.

They always seem to come way too early in the conversation and always at an inopportune time.

The fact is that no matter what you’re selling, the price of your goods and services is always a primary concern to your prospects. Whether you like it or not, price is top of mind with the majority, if not all, of your prospects.  If it isn’t, you might need to question just how serious your prospect is since price is always an important part of the equation when contemplating a purchase.

The fact that prospects are concerned about price isn’t a surprise and it really shouldn’t be a big deal—except it so often comes up before you’ve had any opportunity to establish the value you bring to the table for the prospect, and price without value equals a no sale.

The price question presents you with a serious dilemma:  how do you honestly answer the question of price, yet at the same time save a detailed conversation about price until you have had the opportunity to build the value in your product and service that justifies its price?

The early introduction of the price question seems to put you in a position of having to choose between two rules of selling that appear to be antithetical to one another at this point-1) always answer your prospect’s questions honestly and directly, and 2) never discuss price until you’ve built value in your product or service.

Fortunately, you can honor both rules.

The key to addressing the price question is understanding why the question is asked in the first place.  Many salespeople see the price question as an objection; it isn’t.  It’s an honest question by the prospect who is trying to determine their interest level in your product or service. 

Just as you are trying to qualify your prospect, they’re trying to qualify your product or service, as well as qualifying you, and one of the major qualification questions they have is price.  They’re simply asking the question too early, before they have sufficient information to determine whether your product or service justifies the investment.

The easiest way to handle the question is to give the prospect a direct answer and then bridge back to your investigation of their wants and needs to build value.  Depending upon the product or service you’re selling, your answer to price may be specific-“This truck is twenty five six fifty four”-or general-“depending upon your specific needs we find when we do the needs analysis, the complete instillation of the software and training can range from a few thousand dollars on up into the low to mid five figures,” or, “Frankly, Jack, at this point I really don’t know because I don’t know what needs to be done, if anything, but I can tell you that the investment can range from just a few thousand dollars on up.  But it depends upon the scope of the work to be done and we’ve still to determine that.”

Your statement then needs to be immediately followed up with a question to bridge back to investigating their needs to help you build value.

In the truck example above you might then ask, “Will you be pulling a trailer often, or just on occasion?”  In this example your full statement would be, “This truck is twenty five six fifty four.  By the way, will you be pulling a trailer often or just on occasion?”  You’ve answered your prospect’s question, but you then lead them back into a discussion of their needs, which will help you determine what vehicle will best meet their needs, give you information to highlight the features of the truck that will meet those needs, and the benefits of those features that will give value to the price of the truck.

In the software example, the full statement might be something like:  “Well, Nancy, depending upon your specific needs we find when we do the needs analysis and the modules you need, the complete instillation and training of the software can be anywhere from a few thousand dollars on up to the low to mid five figures; by the way, what other applications do you run that our software will have to be integrated with?”  Again, you’ve given an honest answer to the price question since at this point you don’t know what the package will cost.  Instead of trying to answer an impossible question, you’ve given the typical cost range and then followed with a question that will put the conversation back on track of investigating your prospect’s needs, allowing you to gather the information you need to build value in your product before you get into a serious price discussion.

In the third, the consulting example, the full statement might be: “Frankly, Jack, at this point I really don’t know because I don’t know what needs to be done, if anything, but I can tell you that the investment can range from just a few thousand dollars on up.  But it depends on the scope of the work to be done and we’ve still to determine that.  What do you think has been the cost of the shipping department’s logjam that has extended shipping time by almost two days?”

Price questions need not create problems for you or for your prospect.  Price is a natural concern for the prospect, but knowing a price without understanding the real value of the product or service is meaningless.  Your job is to answer your prospect’s question and return the conversation to a point where you can build value for your prospect, so they can appreciate the price in context of value.

If you refuse to answer the price question you run the risk of insulting or angering your prospect-not to mention the damage you do to your credibility and trustworthiness.  But if you begin a serious discussion of price before you’ve had the opportunity to build value, you ask your prospect to make an investment without having a basis to determine whether the investment is justified.

April 28, 2010

Snakes, Scorpions, Gila Monsters and Objections: Handled Correctly None of These are Deadly

Living in the desert means living with some pretty nasty neighbors such as rattlesnakes and scorpions, and although they aren’t in my desert, not that far away is another desert resident, the Gila Monster.  All of these are venomous, and although rare for the scorpion and Gila Monster, under the right circumstances they can kill a human.  Fortunately, for us who live with these creatures there are specific actions we can take to prevent them from harming us and our families. 

Also present in my desert—and in your area, no matter what area you work in—are objections to our efforts to sell.  Like snakes, scorpions and Gila Monsters, objections are also venomous; but unlike the scorpion and Gila Monster whose bite is seldom lethal, objections are mass murders, killing tens of thousands–probably millions–of sales every single day.

Despite the fact that objections are deadly for such a massive number of sales, like the poisonous creatures above, objections need not be deadly if we simply learn how to prevent them from harming our sales.

A few lessons from how we handle poisonous creatures can be easily and successfully applied to handling objections:

  1. Keep the objections away.  Our primary defense against our venomous neighbors is to anticipate the environment that would attract them and to then create an environment that would discourage their presence.  We keep our lawns mown and gardens weeded not just so our home looks good, but to prevent unwanted creatures from having a place to hide.  They hate being out in the open where they can be easily spotted and attacked by their enemies.

    We do the same with objections by creating an environment that discourages them.  We anticipate the typical objections we get and weave into our presentation the answer to the objection before it is asked.  Just as we whack down weeds before they become problem areas where a snake or Gila Monster can hide, we whack down objections before they have a chance to grow into an issue of real consequence.

  2. Don’t let the objection linger.  Once we notice there is a problem—we spot a rattlesnake or a scorpion nest—we take immediate action.  We don’t let it stick around.  Our question is never “do we address it” but “how do we address it.”  Do we need to call in a professional or can we handle it ourselves?  Do we need to kill it or find a way to move it somewhere where it—and we—can live safely? 

    An objection demands we do the same—acknowledge its presence and take immediate action.  And just as we must decide how best to deal with our unwanted neighbor, we must decide how most effectively to handle the objection.  Do we answer it fully now or explain that we will address it later at a more appropriate time?  Whether we address it now or move it to a later time, we must let the prospect know we understand the objection and that we will in fact address it fully.  If we let it linger without acknowledging it, we may as well take its poison and inject it directly into our veins. 

  3. Address the objection and probe for others.  When we find an unwanted visitor around our home, we not only have to eradicate it but we have to do a thorough search to make sure there aren’t any more around.  At times we may be tempted to reassure ourselves that the one scorpion was all there were and we don’t have to bother with a detailed search.  If we don’t make sure we got them all, we’re only setting ourselves up for a whole boatload of trouble a little later. 

    It’s the same with objections.  To bastardize Woody Allen in Everything You Wanted to Know About Sex But Were Afraid to Ask, “these things usually travel in groups.” (ASIDE FOR MY YOUTH READERS (those under 50): the scene is a giant boob running amuck, squirting milk at everyone in its path. When Allen finally manages to trap it in a giant bra, he warns his companion to be careful because “these things usually travel in pairs.”)  Like the giant boob, objections seldom travel alone.  Probe to uncover and address objections because if you don’t, they’ll likely drown you when you least expect it.

  4. Recognize objections for what they are.  Not all lizards or snakes are poisonous.  Just because it slithers or is cold blooded doesn’t mean it is lethal.  Some of the creatures that have some resemblance to a rattlesnake or Gila Monster are beneficial and welcome in our yards.  We have to be able to differentiate between those creatures that are harmful and those that are beneficial.

    The same goes for objections because not all objections are the same.  There are certainly legitimate objections, but there are also some objections that are designed to stall or just wrangle a lower price.  We must be able to determine which objections are real and which are designed to obstruct or stall.  Asking questions so that you really understand both the objection and the reason for the objection will guide you in determining whether the objection is real or designed to stall or obstruct.

  5. Address objections honestly.  OK, OK, the analogy breaks down at this point.  We really don’t come clean with the rattlesnake that we’re about to kill it, nor do we have a heart to heart conversation with the scorpions, warning them that if they don’t move we’re going to spray their nest with poison; not because we’re heartless, but simply because we find them too similar to our children—lousy listeners, so what’s the use?

            When it comes to objections, however, we must deal with them openly, honestly, and fully.  For many of us the
            temptation is to try to hide or even deny the truth—whatever it takes to make a sale.  But doing so ultimately
           only creates an unhappy, unsatisfied client likely to tell a great many about our dishonest and unethical
           practices.

          As with all things in sales, honesty is the only real policy.  Yes, on occasion it may mean losing a sale.  But the
          lost sales will pale in comparison to loyalty and word of mouth gained by giving your clients what they seldom
         get—straightforward, honest guidance from a seller.

Objections don’t have to kill your sales, you just need to handle them way you’d handle any deadly critter—find ‘em and eradicate ‘em.  Better yet, make your presentation a place where objections can’t hide and grow.

October 30, 2009

Guest Article: “Ten Secrets of Persuasion,” by Nido Qubein

Filed under: Closing Sales,Handling questions,Persuasion,sales,selling — Paul McCord @ 10:14 am
Tags: , ,

Ten Secrets of Persuasion
by Nido Qubein

Do you want to boost your selling power?  Then, add power to your persuasion.

But how can you add power to our persuasion?  How can you become more effective at persuading your customers to buy?

Let’s look at the way the skilled professionals put power into their ability to persuade.

Let me share with you ten secrets I’ve learned from some of the most persuasive salespeople in America — ten ways to add power to your persuasion.  I call them the 10 P’s of persuasion.

(1) Be positive.

One of the most successful insurance salesmen in America is a country fellow from South Georgia, who says, “You can no more sell something you don’t believe in, than you can come back from some place you ain’t been.”

Successful salespeople are positive people.

They have positive mental attitudes about themselves, the companies they represent, the products or services they’re selling, the prospects they’re attempting to persuade, the country they live in.  They’re positive about everything.

Enthusiasm is contagious.  When you’re excited about life and the work you’re doing, you can persuade with power, because you can get other people excited.

(2) Prospect. 

Successful salespeople have learned to direct their persuasive power toward people who have the resources to buy and have good reasons to buy what they are selling.

Professional salespeople pinpoint prospects who are likely to provide long-term profitability.  They analyze the possibilities for cross-selling.  They know that it takes an average of three calls to cross-sell an existing customer but seven to sell to a new customer.

In short, the powerful persuader targets all efforts at the person who has the resources, the motivation, and the authority to buy, and the potential for profitable repeat sales.

(3) Prepare. 

Red Motley, who started Parade magazine, said that the average salesperson will work like crazy to get an appointment, then blow the opportunity with a poor presentation after the decision-maker has agreed to the interview.

You don’t make sales to busy people by rambling on for 40 minutes about features and benefits.  Usually, after such disjointed presentations, neither the salesperson nor the prospect can summarize what’s just been said. 

Professional salespeople always do their homework.  They know that the better they’re prepared, the more persuasive they’ll be when they walk in to make a presentation. 

They research to find out everything they need to know about the prospect.  They plan what they will show and what they will say.  And they practice, practice, practice.
 
(4) Perform. 

Amateur salespeople complain furiously when they are beaten out by a competitor.  How could that customer buy that overpriced, poor-quality product? He must be an idiot!

The customer was no idiot.  The complainer was just outperformed by a more competitive salesperson. 

Remember: People don’t buy; they’re sold.  In fact, nothing is ever bought.  Everything has to be sold.  If you don’t make a strong presentation, you can’t persuade your prospect to buy.

Powerful persuaders are like stage actors playing to a full house.  They are artists at making their presentations.  They’re entertaining and informative to watch and hear.

To succeed in business, you have to make every second of every minute of your “action time” count.

(5) Be perceptive. 

Powerful persuaders are alert to everything that happens during a sales interview. 

They are not preoccupied with personal problems, with airline schedules, or even with the next call they are going to make.  They know that reaching a sales goal always begins with making the sale at hand.

Powerful persuaders tune into their prospects and look for the motivating forces in the life of each.  Once they discover that motivating force, they play to the motivation.

To add power to your persuasion, learn to read your prospects and to discover the motivations they have to buy or not to buy.

(6) Probe.

Average salespeople do a lot of talking.  They can give you a 30-minute speech on any subject you want to name.

That’s why silence is so threatening to most salespeople.  The instant a prospect pauses to take a breath, the amateur will jump in with a sales spiel, just to break the silence.

But powerful persuaders use questions to diagnose the needs and concerns of a prospect much as a skilled physician uses them to diagnose the problems of a patient.

They become masters at asking penetrating questions, and they use those questions to draw prospects into the selling process.
 
(7) Personalize.

The most powerful word in selling is you.

The emphasis on you marks the difference between manipulative and non-manipulative selling.

Manipulative selling is self-centered.  It focuses on what the salesperson wants and needs.

Non-manipulative selling is client-centered.  It focuses on the needs and desires of the prospect.

A person who is looking at the business proposition you are offering wants to know just one thing: What’s in it for me?

If you want to add power to your persuasion, personalize every part of your presentation to meet your prospect’s own personal needs and wants.

(8) Please. 

Powerful persuaders seek to close sales by pleasing their clients.  When prospects become excited about the idea of owning what you’re selling, they become customers.

Professional salespeople know that they can’t force their prospects to buy.  Their challenge is to make them want to buy.  So they seek to please them in so many ways that they create the desire to buy.

(9) Prove.

Salespeople with selling savvy don’t make statements they can’t back up with facts. 

And they don’t expect their clients to accept at face value everything they say.  They are always prepared to prove every claim they make — to back up those claims with hard data, with test results, and with performance records.

One of the best ways to persuade by proving is to give proof statements from people who are happy with your products or services.  Third-party endorsements go a long way in building credibility for your claims, and for your products.

Facts and testimonials are very persuasive.  Learn to use them, and become a powerful persuader.

(10) Persist.

Call on good prospects as many times as it takes to sell them.  About 80% of sales are made on the fifth call or later.  Yet studies have shown that:

·  50% of America’s salespeople call on a prospect one time, and quit.
·  18% call on a prospect twice, and give up.
·  7% call three times, and call it quits.
·  5% call on a prospect four times before quitting.
·  Only 20% call on a prospect five or more times before they quit.

It’s that 20% who close 80% of the sales in America.

You don’t have to become a dynamic personality to sell.  You don’t have to put pressure on people, or out-talk people to sell. 

The most effective thing you can do is to apply your own selling savvy to these ten ways to add strength to your persuasion.

Learn how to persuade more effectively and you will boost your selling power.

Nido Qubein is president of High Point University, an accredited undergraduate and graduate institution with 3,000 students from 50 countries and 44 states. He has written numerous books and recorded scores of audio and video learning programs including a bestseller on effective communication published by Nightingale-Conant and Berkley. Qubein’s business  savvy led him to help start a bank in 1986 and today he serves on the board and executive committee of a Fortune 500 financial corporation with 115 billion-dollars in assets and 25,000 employees. He is also chairman of Great Harvest Bread Company with 218 stores in 42 states. He serves on the boards of several national organizations including the La-Z-Boy Corporation, one of the world’s largest and most recognized furniture retailers. Learn more about Nido Qubein at http://www.nidoqubein.com

February 10, 2009

Run Don’t Walk

Today’s the day!  Can’t say much till Noon Pacific Standard Time–but it is worth the wait.

Noon today PST, the doors open – on an offer that has the potential to save you thousands of dollars, increase your sales exponentially, and perhaps best of all give you peace of mind in the midst of a downward spiraling economy, massive budget cuts and increased sales quotas!

Watch the countdown to noon here.

Best,

Paul McCord


At noon PST run, don’t walk to here

November 18, 2008

Avoiding the Price Question Early in the Sale

The price of your goods and services is always a primary concern to your prospects. Whether you like it or not, price is top of mind with the majority, if not all, of your prospects; and you probably find the question of price comes up in your conversations with prospects long before you have had the opportunity to build value in your product and service.

The price question presents you with a serious dilemma-how do you honestly answer the question of price, yet at the same time save a detailed conversation about price until you have had the opportunity to build the value in your product and service that justifies its price?

The early introduction of the price question seems to put you in a position of having to choose between two rules of selling that appear to be antithetical to one another at this point-always answer your prospect’s questions honestly and directly, and never discuss price until you’ve built value in your product or service.

Fortunately, you can honor both rules.

The key to addressing the price question is understanding why the question is asked in the first place.  Many salespeople see the price question as an objection-it isn’t.  It’s an honest question by the prospect who is trying to determine their interest level in your product or service.  Just as you are trying to qualify your prospect, they’re trying to qualify your product or service, as well as qualifying you, and one of the major qualification questions they have is price.  They’re simply asking the question too early, before they have sufficient information to determine whether your product or service justifies the investment.

The easiest way to handle the question is to give the prospect a direct answer and then bridge back to your investigation of their wants and needs to build value.  Depending upon the product or service you’re selling, your answer to price may be specific-“This truck is twenty five six fifty four”-or general-“depending upon your specific needs we find when we do the needs analysis, the complete instillation of the software and training can range from a few thousand dollars on up.”

Your statement then needs to be immediately followed up with a question to bridge back to investigating their needs to help you build value.

In the truck example above you might then ask, “Will you be pulling a trailer often, or just on occasion?”  In this example your full statement would be, “This truck is twenty five six fifty four.  By the way, will you be pulling a trailer often or just on occasion?”  You’ve answered your prospect’s question, but you then lead them back into a discussion of their needs, which will help you determine what vehicle will best meet their needs, give you information to highlight the features of the truck that will meet those needs, and the benefits of those features that will give value to the price of the truck.

In the software example, the full statement might be something like:  “Well, Nancy, depending upon your specific needs we find when we do the needs analysis, the complete instillation and training of the software can be anywhere from a few thousand dollars on up; by the way, what other applications do you run that our software will have to be integrated with?”  Again, you’ve given an honest answer to the price question since at this point you don’t know what the package will cost.  Instead of trying to answer an impossible question, you’ve given the typical cost range and then followed with a question that will put the conversation back on track of investigating your prospect’s needs, allowing you to gather the information you need to build value in your product before you get into a serious price discussion.

Price questions need not create problems for you or for your prospect.  Price is a natural concern for the prospect, but knowing a price without understanding the real value of the product or service is meaningless.  Your job is to answer your prospect’s question and return the conversation to a point where you can build value for your prospect, so they can appreciate the price in context of value.

If you refuse to answer the price question you run the risk of insulting or angering your prospect-not to mention the damage you do to your credibility and trustworthiness.  But if you begin a serious discussion of price before you’ve had the opportunity to build value, you ask your prospect to make an investment without having a basis to determine whether the investment is justified.

By addressing your prospect’s question briefly but honestly, and then moving the conversation back to investigating your client’s needs and wants, you can successfully delay a detailed conversation about price until you’ve had the opportunity to demonstrate why your product or service justifies its price.

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