Sales and Sales Management Blog

January 31, 2014

5 Strategies to Maintain and Strengthen Your Motivation

Filed under: Uncategorized — Paul McCord @ 3:45 pm
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If you want to be successful you have to be motivated.

What is motivation?

Motivation is a unique combination of desire, commitment, and energy to reach a goal no matter how difficult it may be or how long it may take to reach.

Another way of looking at it is passion.

Passion in and of itself can virtually force you to succeed by demanding you do those things necessary to be successful.

Passion won’t let you rest.

It won’t give you permission to quit.

It won’t allow you to become sated until you’ve reached your goal.

Passion demands your best effort.

It pushes you to go beyond the satisfactory to the extraordinary.

It forces you to reach heights you thought impossible.

Passion is pretty heady stuff.  It keeps you on the edge.  It sharpens your senses, keeping you alert to opportunities.  It awakens the creative juices.

It helps keep the self-doubt and the  fears and worries at bay.  It doesn’t eliminate them, it overcomes them.

Unfortunately, passion isn’t limitless.  It has limitations and weaknesses.  Although strong, it must be reinforced or you risk having it burn itself out.

How do you keep your passion burning?

Here are 5 down and dirty ways to reinforce your passion and keep it burning strong:

  1. Love what you do. There is no substitute for doing something you absolutely love doing.  If you can hardly wait to get out of bed in the morning to get your day started you’re already half way to success.  Certainly we can’t all be engaged in something we absolutely love, but if you can, even if only on a part-time basis, go for it.

  2. Set tangible, realistic short-term goals.  The more often you see tangible progress, the easier to maintain your passion.  Set short-term, realistic goals.  If you consistently see small goals being reached, you’ll soon begin to see large goals being reached.  By the way, reasonable goals don’t mean easy to reach goals.  Goals should consistently stretch you and your abilities.
  3. Visualize outcomes.  Athletes use visualization for a reason—it works.  If you are afraid of making presentations, visualize yourself making great presentations.  If you fear cold calling, visualize yourself being successful at cold calling. Visualization is a form of practice.  In a study a couple of years ago researchers found that students who only visualized practicing a piece of music were as proficient at playing the piece as students who had actually practiced the piece on the piano.
  4. Use positive affirmations.  Repeating positive affirmations strengthens and reaffirms your internal belief system.  We cannot do what we do not believe we can do.  On the other hand, if we sincerely believe we can do something, no matter how ‘impossible,’ our brain can find ways to get it done.  Once we believe, our brain begins to go work to figure out a way to turn our belief into reality.

   Our brain will believe what it hears and what our eyes see.  If it has heard and witnessed failure for years and years, it   believes we will fail.  Fortunately, we can change that. It will take time.  We will have to
consciously   retrain it.  We’ll have to give it positive reinforcement through what it hears—our positive affirmations—and what it experiences—our small successes as we reach our short-term goals.  But just as it
learned we are a failure, it will learn we are successful—but this time we can control what we feed our brain.

  1. Use outside reinforcement.  Motivation—passion—is internal.  It isn’t something that is created externally.  That doesn’t mean that  external stimulus can’t reinforce our internal motivation.  The problem is that external stimulus such as motivation books, tapes, seminars, and such burn out quickly—usually within just a few days, sometimes within just a few hours.

   That quick burn doesn’t mean external stimulus can’t be valuable.  It can be extremely valuable.  A motivational tape can give us a great burst of energy prior to an important presentation; a motivational seminar can
get our creative juices flowing in new directions; motivation quotes can realign our minds at moments of exhaustion or weakness.

   Keep favorite motivational tapes and quotes ready at hand.  Take the opportunity to attend motivational seminars and presentations.  Remember the ‘high’ is fleeting—but you can drink of it anytime you need it.

Companies spend billions of dollars every year trying to find the magic motivational bullet.  They’ll never find it because it isn’t something they can order in from a motivational speaker.  We either have it or we don’t.  But if we don’t, we can take the steps necessary to find it and nurture it.

And it isn’t expensive, difficult, or time consuming.

Find your passion and you’ll find your success.  If you’re a sales leader, help your sales team members find their passion and you’ll find your success.

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January 30, 2014

Guest Article: “How to Quickly Build LinkedIn and Facebook Connections,” by Kelly McCormick

Filed under: Uncategorized — Paul McCord @ 1:39 pm
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How to Quickly Build LinkedIn and Facebook Connections
by Kelly McCormick

There is an art to making connections in the virtual business world. As the term implies, ‘Social Networking’ is about building relationships. And the best place to start the process is at the ‘invitation’ stage.

From personal experience, the ‘Accept’ ratio increases when a personalized message is included in requests to connect.

BUT, it’s important that the ‘personalized’ message doesn’t sound phony or like a template. So let me show you what to do and say instead.

Ditch The Default Message

Start by deleting the default request to connect messages. For example, on LinkedIn the default message reads, ‘I’d like to add you to my professional network.’

Facebook sends out an equally generic request. However, before you hit send, you can select the ‘Message’ option. This is where you’ll write your personalized note.

Try This

In your personalized message, be upfront about your desire to connect.

Even a simple statement like:

“Hi, I don’t believe that we’ve met. However, we seem to know many people in common and I’d like to include you in my network… [look forward to reading your posts/sharing resources/learning more about you…].”

Best Request I Received

The best, LOL, request to connect I’ve ever received came via LinkedIn. The ‘invitation’ was from someone I had never met.

The fellow checked off the ‘Friend’ box and took a guess as to my email address. Bingo! His request made it to me.

When I opened the invitation, the message simply said, “Ok, we’re not friends and we’ve never met. However, I would like to connect. What do you think?”

Wondering how I responded?

Well, I hit reply and typed, “That was a refreshingly creative approach. You are definitely someone I’d like in my network.” I then hit send and ‘Accept’!

His approach may not work for everyone. However, the point is to include a message with your requests to connect and go for it.

 

Kelly McCormick, is a Business Growth and Marketing Strategist. She helps entrepreneurs & companies to identify opportunities for growth. Plus, she develops targeted branding, marketing & sales strategies.

January 29, 2014

The Base Top 50 Sales Pros to Follow on Twitter–I’m Honored to be on the List

Filed under: Uncategorized — Paul McCord @ 11:01 am

I’m Honored to be Included in the Base Top 50 Sales Pros to Follow on Twitter

Base CRM honored me by including me on a list of 50 sales pros they suggest people follow on Twitter.  The list is truly an All-Star list of some of the most significant thought leaders and professionals in sales today and I am humbled and greatly honored to be included on the list.  I’m also pleased to say that I know most of these men and women and count them as my friends.

More importantly, I am in agreement with Base that virtually all sellers and sales leaders should be following many, if not all, of these amazing people.   I suspect that not all of the members of the list are writing in areas that are relevant to you, but I bet a great many are.

I won’t take the space to list all 50, but here is just a sampling of the sales training greats you’ll find on the Base Top 50 Sales Pros to Follow on Twitter:

Jill Konrath
Tom Hopkins
Paul Castain
Colleen Francis
Trish Bertuzzi
Jeffrey Gitomer
Dave Stein
Dan Waldschmidt
Gerhard Gschwandtner
Patricia Fripp
Jonathan Farrington
Geoffrey James

Just a quick dozen—head over to the Base blog right now and find out who else is there and, by all means, take the time to follow them—you won’t regret it

January 28, 2014

This Saturday: Learn Why Your Prospecting Isn’t Connecting with Your Prospcts–And What to Do About It

Filed under: Uncategorized — Paul McCord @ 12:31 pm

CONNECT! Online Radio for Professional Sellers to Host Interview with Sales & Lead Generation Authority Paul McCord

 

This Saturday, sales thought-leader and author Paul McCord will share with CONNECT! Online Radio listeners the way to break through all the noise and connect with their prospects.

San Jose, CA (PRWEB) January 28, 2014

People First Productivity Solutions, a San Francisco Bay Area based training and development company, invites professional sellers to join sales coach and host Deb Calvert on Saturday as she interviews Paul McCord. McCord, a renowned authority in lead generation and personal marketing, will be sharing with listeners how they can most effectively connect with prospects in this broadcast of CONNECT! Online Radio Show, “Why Your Prospecting Isn’t Connecting with Your Prospects.”

McCord is President of McCord Training and Development and a top 30 Sales Guru. With over three decades of in-the-trenches sales, management and consulting in the business-to-business realm, he specializes in lead generation, using social media as a prospecting tool, referral selling, networking, cold calling and other tools and strategies to find and connect with prospects. He is the author of three best-selling sales books and works with sales teams to develop more effective strategies for connecting with high quality prospects.

During his interview with Calvert, McCord will discuss what he’s learned from experience, and will offer new strategies for connecting with prospects. Calvert and McCord will also discuss why some sellers may not be successful in getting through to prospects and how they can change their behaviors to truly make that connection.

The broadcast will begin at 9:00 am PST. Sales people looking for on-air coaching can call in live to ask their questions, or submit questions ahead of time by sending Deb Calvert an email. Once completed, the broadcast will also be made available in the CONNECT! Online Radio Show archive and can be downloaded on iTunes as a podcast.

To listen live, visit the show page on BlogTalkRadio. Listeners with questions can dial (347) 202-0896 or use the BlogTalkRadio IM feature during the broadcast.

About:
CONNECT! Online Radio Show for Professional Sellers was developed to help sellers like you “Ignite Your Selling Power in Just an Hour!” Hosted by Deb Calvert, a former Fortune 500 executive and author of DISCOVER Questions™ Get You Connected, CONNECT proudly boasts thousands of listeners and a stellar roster of guests. The radio show is one branch of the CONNECT! Community which provides discussion groups, books, blogs and other resources for selling professionals, leaders and emerging leaders, trainers, coaches and individuals. Founded in 2006 by Deb Calvert, People First Productivity Solutions operates with the mission: “We Build Organizational Strength by Putting People First.”

January 27, 2014

Book Review: EDGY Conversations by Dan Waldschmidt

ImageBook Review: EDGY Conversations by Dan Waldschmidt

Are you satisfied with who you are? 

Do you want to be more, accomplish more, be more successful, get where you want to go faster?

Frankly, most of us do.

Most of us really aren’t satisfied with where we are at in life, with who we are as a person, with what we’ve accomplished.

In addition most of us really aren’t sure how to make the changes necessary to get where we want to go.

Dan Waldschmidt in of EDGY Conversations (2014: Hydra Publishing) argues that the last thing we need to help us get where we want to go is another book on success.

And he’s right.  How many more books telling us that success is gained through hard work do we need? 

Waldschmidt’s book as he says isn’t about learning how to “do” but rather how to “be.”  Rather in his words, “This book is about the uncomfortably powerful truths you won’t find in your typical ‘success’ book.  It’s a look behind the scenes at pain, fear, love-yes, love-and the other key attitudes that drive huge success, regardless of the success ‘process’ that you use.”

It’s a book of stories—of success and failure.

It’s a book about living beyond where you’ve been—and maybe beyond where you think you can go.

It pushes, it pulls, it even drags you to the point of taking a hard look at yourself as you really are–and to see what you really can be.

It’s such an easy book to read, yet, if taken seriously, so hard to digest.

Waldschmidt talks openly about his failures, as well as his successes, and about his depressions and his joys.

And he forces us to think about ours as well.

He challenges us to be EDGY, an acronym for Extreme, Disciplined, Giving, and the Y(h)uman factor.

Along the way he talks about a great many things, but in the end it really comes down to the success of being a whole person, of the person you are, not the things you have, the position you hold, the money you make.

Waldschmidt doesn’t hold those things in contempt.  Waldschmidt is speaking of a lalaland, touchy/feely, nirvana type of success.  Rather the success he speaks of is a real success rooted in understanding and developing a whole person—an EDGY person.

None of this makes any sense? 

Good.

Get the book and it will become clear as you learn to overcome the obstacles that prevent you from reaching the success you so much want.

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